The Wonder of Blue Tourmaline

Blue Tourmaline evokes the tranquility of deep blue water and gliding well beneath its surface. It invites surrender of all thought to the solitude of a liquid silence, a graceful world of letting go; then rising to the light. It is also known as Indicolite, a variation of the original Indigolite, and refers to its deep blue color. Rarer than other Tourmalines, it forms in shades of light to dark blue, some with a tint of turquoise.

In the metaphysical world, Blue Tourmaline is a crystal of Spirit and peace, providing for deep meditation and bringing past hurts to the surface for healing. It encourages the release of emotional bonds and frees the mind to explore a higher consciousness and spiritual connection.


Blue Tourmaline increases the ability for clear and honest communication, and lends the courage to speak from the heart. It encourages an open mind and tolerance for others’ differences and weaknesses, embracing a love for truth, ethics, and a sense of responsibility and service to humanity. It promotes living in harmony with all aspects of one’s environment.

A crystal of the Throat and Third Eye Chakras, Blue Tourmaline, especially in darker shades, increases access to higher levels of intuition and may amplify the psychic gifts of clairvoyance, clairaudience, clairsentience, prophecy, and spirit communication. It is highly beneficial to those who wish to become channels or mediums, and assists in processing impressions received from other realms and allowing them to flow out through verbal communication.

Although Tourmaline may be found on every continent, fine crystal specimens and gems are still considered rare and can be quite expensive. Its vast popularity as a gemstone began in 1876, when mineralogist and jeweler George Kunz sold a Green Tourmaline from Maine to the famous Tiffany and Co. in New York, and its desirability spread. More recently it has become a favorite of metaphysical collectors and practitioners for its versatile energy properties.


Tourmaline belongs to a complex family of aluminum borosilicate’s mixed with iron, magnesium, or other various metals that, depending on the proportions of its components, may form as red, pink, yellow, brown, black, green, blue or violet. Its prismatic, vertically striated crystals may be long and slender, or thick and columnar, and are uniquely triangular in cross-section. They often vary in coloration within a single specimen, lengthwise or in cross sections, and may be transparent or opaque. The name Tourmaline comes from an ancient Sinhalese word turmali, meaning “a mixed color precious stone,” or turamali, meaning “something small from the earth

One of Tourmaline’s most distinguishing properties is its ability to become electrically charged simply by heating or rubbing it. When charged, one end becomes positive and the other negative, allowing it to attract particles of dust or bits of paper. This property of pyroelectricity (from heat) or piezoelectricity (from pressure or rubbing) was well-known to the Dutch traders of the 1700s who used Tourmaline to pull ash from their Meerschaum pipes, calling the stone Aschentrekker, or “ash puller.”